Prosecuting the prosecutor

This is the prosecutor who put Michael Morton in a Texas prison for 25 years by suppressing evidence. Here’s a story by Joe Nocera, from The New York Times.

-CB

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In just about a month from now, Texas will witness a rare event: a former prosecutor is going to be held to account for alleged prosecutorial misconduct.

He is Ken Anderson, who for nearly 17 years was the district attorney in Williamson County, a fast-growing suburb of Austin. (In 2002, Gov. Rick Perry made him a district judge.) As Pamela Colloff writes, in a brilliant two-part series in Texas Monthly, Anderson was the kind of prosecutor who “routinely asked for, and won, harsh sentences and fought to keep offenders in prison long after they became eligible for parole.”

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(This is the famous case in which a bloody bandana was found near the scene, but its existence was hidden for years.)

Later in the NYT story we read:

In truth, Anderson isn’t the only Williamson County prosecutor who faced consequences as a result of the Morton case. His successor, John Bradley, was the one who had fought for years against the DNA testing of the bandana. Seven months after Morton was set free, Bradley, who had always been a shoo-in for re-election as district attorney, was resoundingly defeated.

To read the rest of the story, click here.

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